Recherche Kunena

Mot-clé

Analyse des courbes ATL-CTL-TSB etc...

  • Messages : 360
  • Remerciements reçus 15
il y a 5 ans 11 mois #131143 par Juan
Réponse de Juan sur le sujet Analyse des courbes ATL-CTL-TSB etc...
Pour ma part, je vois le CTL commune un indice de forme et l'ATL comme un indice de fatigue. Mon CTL variant très peu depuis plusieurs mois (+/- 10), il me suffit de jeter un oeil à mon ATL pour savoir qu'elle est ma condition du jour...

Il me semble que dans Golden Cheetah on peut paramétrer la durée du CTL et de l'ATL ce qui permet de mieux individualiser le fonctionnement de cet indice. Toutefois, je pense qu'il faut pour cela très très bien se connaitre avoir fait quelques tests pour voir comment le corps réagit...

Tout ceci bien sur n'est valable que si la FTP est correctement évaluée, ce qui peut -être difficile en cas de forte fluctuation de la charge (retour de blessure par exemple. :pafmur: ).

Connexion ou Créer un compte pour participer à la conversation.

  • skippy
  • Portrait de skippy
  • Visiteur
  • Visiteur
il y a 5 ans 11 mois #131146 par skippy
Réponse de skippy sur le sujet Analyse des courbes ATL-CTL-TSB etc...

Pour ma part, je vois le CTL commune un indice de forme et l'ATL comme un indice de fatigue. Mon CTL variant très peu depuis plusieurs mois (+/- 10), il me suffit de jeter un oeil à mon ATL pour savoir qu'elle est ma condition du jour...

Il me semble que dans Golden Cheetah on peut paramétrer la durée du CTL et de l'ATL ce qui permet de mieux individualiser le fonctionnement de cet indice. Toutefois, je pense qu'il faut pour cela très très bien se connaitre avoir fait quelques tests pour voir comment le corps réagit...

Tout ceci bien sur n'est valable que si la FTP est correctement évaluée, ce qui peut -être difficile en cas de forte fluctuation de la charge (retour de blessure par exemple. :pafmur: ).


Le CTL ne doit pas être stable trop longtemps ! L'entraînement à horreur de la monotonie ;-)

Connexion ou Créer un compte pour participer à la conversation.

  • Messages : 360
  • Remerciements reçus 15
il y a 5 ans 11 mois #131148 par Juan
Réponse de Juan sur le sujet Analyse des courbes ATL-CTL-TSB etc...
Oui j'en ai bien conscience mais le vélo n'étant pas ma profession, il m'est difficile d'aller cherche de gros pics de charge qui permettrait de faire varier le CTL...Sauf à ne plus rien faire du tout (mais ça n'aurait pas trop de sens...), je ne vois pas trop comment procéder. ;-)

Connexion ou Créer un compte pour participer à la conversation.

  • Messages : 5329
  • Remerciements reçus 930
il y a 5 ans 11 mois - il y a 5 ans 11 mois #131263 par gillesF78
Je copie l'article de Joe Friel en voie de disparition (page introuvable erreur 404), récupéré avec le cache de Google :
webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:J8...l=fr&strip=1&vwsrc=0

Part 3: Training Stress Balance—So What?

The following appeared a few days ago on the TrainingPeaks.com blog. It’s the last of three-part series on the Performance Management Chart on the TrainingPeaks site and on WKO software. This is a powerful tool for serious athletes and coaches once they learn how to use it.



PMC

Training Stress Balance (TSB), the yellowish line on the Performance Management Chart, is merely a way of describing your race “Form.” What’s form? In a single phrase, it is race readiness.

So how is TSB determined? It’s the result of subtracting today’s Acute Training Load (“Fatigue”—the red line) from today’s Chronic Training Load (“Fitness”—blue line). Both ATL and CTL are expressed as TSS per day (TSS/d). Once the software has done the math the remainder is your TSB (by the way, the resulting TSB value is for tomorrow—not for today.) It can be either a negative or a positive number depending on which is greater—CTL or ATL. If TSB is negative you are likely to be tired and probably not race ready. If TSB is positive then you are probably rested and perhaps on form—if it doesn’t get too high.

So what? What do the TSB numbers mean and how can you use them to be race ready? Let’s dig a little deeper using exact TSB numbers as guidelines.

When I’m tapering and peaking athletes for A-priority races I like to have their TSB/Form at around +15 to +25 on race day. I’ve found that usually produces the best results. But not always. For some unknown reason there are athletes who perform best when their TSB/Form is just barely positive, around + 5 to +10. I don’t know if this is physiological or psychological. It’s just the way it is for some.

The range between -10 and +10 is generally a transitional phase. Time in this range should be rather brief. There are two common reasons to be in this range. The first is that you are moving through it toward being on form for a race (daily workout TSS is decreasing and TSB/Form is rising). The other common reason is that you are returning to focused training after a few days break and moving toward greater fatigue (daily TSS is increasing and TSB is falling).

If you spend much time in this -10 to +10 TSB range your training is stagnant. Not much is happening. Other than peaking for a race or when in a rest and recovery break lasting a handful of days, this range is best avoided. Staying there for a long time, such as two weeks or more, is seldom a good thing. Try to pass through it in only a few days.

As mentioned above, TSB/Form is closely related to your readiness to race. When it’s below -10 you’re probably too tired to race well. You’re not “on form.” That may be ok for a C-priority race. For a B race you will probably want your TSB trending positive and somewhat above -10. Perhaps even at zero to +10. And, as mentioned, an A-priority race should probably be greater than +10 for most athletes.

If you wander north of +25 your training is much too easy. You’re losing a lot of fitness. This sad situation could be the result of injury, illness, lifestyle-based training interruption, or anything else that drastically reduces your training load. Your recent workout TSS is simply too low for some reason.

The other side of the coin is driving your TSB too low. For most athletes I’ve found keeping TSB in the -10 to -30 range when the training is hard and focused is a very productive and healthy range. This could be, for example, in the serious training weeks of the base and build periods. In this range the likelihood of a breakdown is kept in check. But going south of -30 greatly increases your risk. Managing this part of the training period is done by making sure every recovery day TSS is appropriately low and that there are adequate recovery days each week. For some athletes a recovery day may mean a zero—a day off. For others it’s a session with a lower than usual TSS.

Franz Stampfl, Roger Bannister’s coach back in the 1950s, said, “Training is principally an act of faith.” By that he meant that you can’t predict exactly what will happen in a race regardless of how you may train. The Performance Management Chart with its CTL/Fitness, ATL/Fatigue, and, especially TSB/Form, is a way of reducing the wishing and hoping that happens shortly before a race. But it by no means eliminates the individuality of training. You still must pay close attention to determine how your performance responds to varying degrees of TSB/Form.

Posted at 11:00 AM | Permalink

| Reblog (0)
Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.
Richard Egan

hey joe,

i have two races coming up in consecutive weekends. the second i woul say is my A event. however this weekend im going to Paris and ill be five days off the bike. my ctl is 90 and im planning on driving it up to 100, with -50TSB before i go away but knowing that ill be five days completely off the bike. when i come back im hoping ill be fresh and revitalised for the two hard weekends coming up. my ctl has stagnated a little recently and has been at about 80 for two months! is my reasoning ok on this?

Posted by: Richard Egan | 09/15/2015 at 10:11 AM
Joe Friel

Richard Egan--Yes, I think you're doing the right thing. I do something very similar before long trips. Good luck!


Région Grenobloise, GillesF78
Dernière édition: il y a 5 ans 11 mois par gillesF78.
Les utilisateur(s) suivant ont remercié: lepetitcyclistedu64

Connexion ou Créer un compte pour participer à la conversation.

  • Messages : 5329
  • Remerciements reçus 930
il y a 5 ans 11 mois #131558 par gillesF78
J'ai récupéré une feuille excel qui est pas mal pour planifier l'entrainement : voir la pièce jointe...

Fichier attaché :

Nom du fichier : calendrier_v2.xls
Taille du ficher :2,721 ko


La source :
setark0s.wordpress.com/

Région Grenobloise, GillesF78
Pièces jointes :
Les utilisateur(s) suivant ont remercié: lepetitcyclistedu64

Connexion ou Créer un compte pour participer à la conversation.

  • Messages : 28
  • Remerciements reçus 0
il y a 5 ans 11 mois #131571 par lepetitcyclistedu64
Une belle trouvaille merci beaucoup @gillesf78

Connexion ou Créer un compte pour participer à la conversation.

  • skippy
  • Portrait de skippy
  • Visiteur
  • Visiteur
il y a 5 ans 11 mois #131572 par skippy
Réponse de skippy sur le sujet Analyse des courbes ATL-CTL-TSB etc...

Une belle trouvaille merci beaucoup @gillesf78


Oui tu top fichier. Bon ça pas hyper rapide pour un coach mais cela permet à chaque cycliste de se faire son programme et de piloter son entraînement ;-)

Connexion ou Créer un compte pour participer à la conversation.

  • Messages : 6315
  • Remerciements reçus 768
il y a 4 ans 10 mois #141428 par stam
Réponse de stam sur le sujet Analyse des courbes ATL-CTL-TSB etc...
Voilà une courbe que j'analyserai plus tard mais qu'il me faut immortaliser, car ce n'est pas demain la veille que j'en referai une comme ça :

ATL stratosphérique (pour moi) obtenu par 25h de vélo sur 5 jours à une NP proche de 68% FTP. Intensité assez faible donc, pas de sensation d'avoir les jambes bloquées sur le vélo, je vais observer avec curiosité l'évolution des jours prochains...
Pièces jointes :

Connexion ou Créer un compte pour participer à la conversation.

  • Messages : 10320
  • Remerciements reçus 849
il y a 4 ans 10 mois #141463 par jfd_
Réponse de jfd_ sur le sujet Analyse des courbes ATL-CTL-TSB etc...
Je ne me souviens plus exactement à quel moment mais on avait parlé il y a un certain temps (2 ans, 3 ans?, je ne sais plus trop :blush:) des bienfaits vantés par certains entraineurs des entrainements basse intensité mais gros volume horaire. Ne serait-ce pas une manifestation pratique d'un apport de cela sur toi ?

Connexion ou Créer un compte pour participer à la conversation.

  • Messages : 9980
  • Remerciements reçus 771
il y a 4 ans 10 mois #141464 par albator83
Il me semble que c'était l'entraînement polarisé ? Rentable à condition d'avoir énormément de temps pour accumuler les heures de selle, et la génétique qui va bien pour encaisser la charge.
J'ai expérimenté ça sur trois semaines de vacances l'an passé : 20h hebdo à bouffer du col @ i2-i3, des grosses siestes et de bons repas tous les jours => quelques jours de surcompensation plus tard j'étais dans une forme exceptionnelle :yaisse: (alignant au passage CP5/CP20 sans la moindre intensité le mois précédent :whistle: )

Connexion ou Créer un compte pour participer à la conversation.

  • Messages : 1383
  • Remerciements reçus 48
il y a 4 ans 10 mois #141465 par servodep
Mais alors on revient au début, à ma jeunesse, dans les années 70 (chères à Bernard Hinault), bouffer du km, des heures de selle :wonder:

Tout çà pour çà :lol:

Born to lose, live to win

Connexion ou Créer un compte pour participer à la conversation.

  • Messages : 9980
  • Remerciements reçus 771
il y a 4 ans 10 mois #141466 par albator83
Pour des pros peut-être... mais pour des amateurs avec un boulot à côté c'est pas mal de pouvoir optimiser 10h de vélo hebdo avec les méthodes d'entraînement modernes ;-)

Connexion ou Créer un compte pour participer à la conversation.

  • Messages : 10320
  • Remerciements reçus 849
il y a 4 ans 10 mois #141467 par jfd_
Réponse de jfd_ sur le sujet Analyse des courbes ATL-CTL-TSB etc...
C'était bien l'entrainement polarisé :yaisse: Mais faire ce que tu décris effectivement n'est que peu compatible avec une vie 'normale' de salarié (sans compte les aspect familiaux comme gamins,etc, etc).

De plus pour l'époque Hinault, les notions i1, i2, ix.... n'étaient pas vraiment des critères de premier plan :whistle:

Connexion ou Créer un compte pour participer à la conversation.

  • Messages : 2523
  • Remerciements reçus 248
il y a 4 ans 10 mois #141468 par cycloflamand
En mai et en juin, à 1 mois d'intervalle, j'ai eu le temps de faire une semaine de 15h de vélo et 380km en mai, 15h de vélo et 390km en juin. L'ATL est monté à 110, le CTL a grimpé est passé les 98, par contre la semaine suivante c'était le contre-coup.
Finalement avec 10h de vélo, l'ATL reste autour de 90TSS/j, ce qui semble plus raisonnable en période ou je dois assurer à côté du vélo (porter du matériel de sono le week-end notamment...).
Chose étrange, en ce moment mes courbes ATL et TSB se chevauchent, pourtant je me sens moins frais qu'en mai ou je trainais un TSB négatif depuis quelques temps... Cà doit surement se jouer dans la tête !

Connexion ou Créer un compte pour participer à la conversation.

  • Messages : 6315
  • Remerciements reçus 768
il y a 4 ans 10 mois #141475 par stam
Réponse de stam sur le sujet Analyse des courbes ATL-CTL-TSB etc...
Dans l'entraînement polarisé il y a quand même 15% du temps passé au-dessus de 105% FTP (j'en suis à 6% depuis début juillet :whistle: ), en évitant le pot-au-noir (5% autour de 95-105% FTP - là ch'uis bien :lol: ).

Connexion ou Créer un compte pour participer à la conversation.

  • Messages : 62
  • Remerciements reçus 5
il y a 2 ans 3 semaines #162521 par Alex38
Je déterre un peu le post...
Mais super intéressant comme sujet pour moi qui suis novice en la matière.
J'avoue n'être encore pas très à l'aise dans l'argumentation de mes courbes.
En même temps je n'ai pas encore trop d'ancienneté avec mon capteur.

Connexion ou Créer un compte pour participer à la conversation.

  • Messages : 100
  • Remerciements reçus 19
il y a 2 ans 3 semaines - il y a 2 ans 3 semaines #162548 par RenardArgenté
Hello,

Pas évident d'appréhender ces courbes.

Le rapport qui regroupe le CTL, ATL et TSB sont dans un graphe appelé PMC (Performance Mangement Chart sur WKO). Je ne connais son nom sur GC.

Ce graphe est utile sur le moyen et long terme. Il permet surtout un suivi quantitatif (et non qualitatif sur les thème travaillés dans un cycle) basé sur la charge d'entraînement (dépendant du TSS).

Très utilisé en fin de saison pour débriefer l'année écoulée et planifier la saison suivante. Également dans un plan pluriannuel cela permet de ne pas reproduire des erreurs et d'optimiser le macro planning.

Pour que les CTL et ATL soient justes la FTP doit-être correctement renseignées.

quelques pistes:
  1. mesure de la pente du CTL en début de saison. Souvent ne pas aller trop vite trop fort permet de construire la saison, ne pas être cramé au mois de juin
  2. Voir quel niveau de CTL et de TSB ont permis d'obtenir les meilleurs CPs, pics de forme ou meilleures courses
  3. Corrélation entre blessure et charge

exemple de suivi pluriannuel (sans ATL qui n'est pas si utile):

Pièces jointes :
Dernière édition: il y a 2 ans 3 semaines par RenardArgenté.

Connexion ou Créer un compte pour participer à la conversation.

  • Messages : 62
  • Remerciements reçus 5
il y a 2 ans 3 semaines #162556 par Alex38
Oui, j'avais compris tout cela.
Mais ça ne fait pas encore un mois que je possède mon capteur de puissance.
Mais je commence à m'y intéresser et regarde l'évolution journalière afin de mieux comprendre le fonctionnement de mon organisme.
J'utilise la plateforme Garmin (un peu), GC (pas mal) et Nolio (beaucoup).
Cette dernière va même bientôt fusionner avec l'application Hapt afin de pouvoir corréler tout cela avec la VFC.
Ce qui peut-être encore plus intéressant.
:lunettes:

Connexion ou Créer un compte pour participer à la conversation.

  • Messages : 6298
  • Remerciements reçus 631
il y a 2 ans 3 semaines #162559 par lebad
Par contre, je pense qu'il faut attendre un mois de sorties normales=dehors pour te fier à ces courbes.

Connexion ou Créer un compte pour participer à la conversation.

  • Messages : 62
  • Remerciements reçus 5
il y a 2 ans 3 semaines #162561 par Alex38
Oui, je pense bien. Mais à défaut de pouvoir rouler à l'extérieur actuellement je commence à zieuter un peu quand même.
Qui peut le plus...peut le plus.
Un peu comme avec le PPR. Vu que l'on ne peut pas faire des sorties sur home-trainer de 3,4,5h voir plus, mon PPR est limité à 1h30 actuellement.
Vivement que tout rentre dans l'ordre?
Et un CP5, CP20 ou autre sur home-trainer est à priori moins productif que sur la route.
Une fois à l'extérieur je pourrai m'en donner à coeur joie.
;-)

Connexion ou Créer un compte pour participer à la conversation.

Temps de génération de la page : 0.161 secondes
Propulsé par Kunena